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2019 is gone and in the books. We can’t change the past, but we can influence the future. When it comes to money, it’s not how much you earn, but it is definitely how much you save that determines your financial future.The question is how do I save money? I have children, bills and other fin… Read more g

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Jim Cravey woke up one May morning in 1947 from a dream he had about a lost gold mine in the Superstition Mountains. He was convinced it was the Lost Dutchman Mine. He believed from his dream he could find the mine. Read more g

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The realities of the modern economy, an economy primarily dominated by large nationally branded, investor-owned companies, is plagued with several stark realities. These realities vary in size, scope and range depending upon one’s economic contribution, but the overall impact to society is s…

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For the third year in a row, Apache Junction/ Gold Canyon kids have shined in a yearly event known as AJ Kids Idol. I have no doubt in my mind you’ve heard of American Idol or America's Got Talent. Well, this yearly event, that I have the personal pleasure in helping put on, is one of the be…

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In the coming weeks, The Apache Junction & Gold Canyon News is bringing you a series of articles, written by Kevin Fort, Executive Director and Chief Operations Officer for Regenerative Business Institute (RBI), a cooperative development firm working on a business and economic developmen…

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The nautical history of Canyon Lake has been an interesting one. When Canyon Lake was first filled in 1925, several valley entrepreneurs were convinced they could operate a profitable business enterprise by transporting visitors by bus up the Apache Trail and then place them on a tour boat f…

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The spirit of Christmas was in the air in late December of 1955. The first snows had fallen in Arizona’s high country and winter had announced its arrival in the Superstition Wilderness. Low stratus clouds engulfed the towering spires of Superstition Mountain, and a slow, drizzling rain fell…

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Long ago, in the desert we now see as home, a desert some now see as inhospitable, the Hohokam people flourished. Their story began around 300 A.D., when a small group of people from the Gila-Salt River Basin was able to organize community labor and dig a canal for three miles through hard v…

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Many years ago, I was riding in the Horse Camp Ridge area, when I came upon an interesting trail. The trail had been carved out of solid stone by animals carrying heavy loads. There were places were the hooves of the beast of burden had worn deep into the volcanic tufa.

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Here in the valley of the sun, many people are already retired. But what do you explain to someone who is not sure whether or not they are ready to retire? Of course, one of the most important factors is of the financial nature. Questions begin to arise. Will you receive a pension? If so, wi…

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The Superstition Wilderness Area and Superstition Mountain, in particular, have been an attraction to human kind for more than a millennium. First came the Native Americans who found the region conducive to their way of living. Hunting and gathering was their main means of survival. The regi…

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From the time most of us are old enough to earn an allowance, we are taught that “a penny saved is a penny earned.”

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There are many stories among storytellers about lost Spanish Jesuit Missions in the Apacheria. The Apacheria included lands above and below the Gila River. The Jesuits established many missions and vistas in the Pimeria Alta. The church missions were permanent settlement sites and were assig…

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Have any of you ever wondered about the source of the place named Massacre Ground? There are many stories about this site on the northwestern end of Superstition Mountain. The story begins in the early settlement of Phoenix more than a hundred and thirty-six years ago.

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Probably one the most bizarre searches I have ever been involved with occurred in the summer of 1980. Like my friend Bob Corbin, I had sworn to stay out of the Superstition Mountains in the summer time. The extreme heat was dangerous and rattlesnakes were quite common—not to mention water wa…

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The late 1950s found me working on a cattle ranch known as the old “Quarter Circle U” in the Superstition Mountains. I was following a dream to be a cowboy. My education about cowboys had been derived from the Western movies at the old Rex Theater in Hayden, Arizona, and my dream to be a cow…

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On March 23, 1961, a body was discovered in the Superstition Wilderness by John Pearce, 78, and Harold Moulton, 40, of Glendale, Arizona. The men were prospectors in the area of Weaver’s Needle. Pearce’s camp was about 600 yards from the spot where the body was discovered in Needle Canyon.

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Prior to roads and the horse drawn carriage the only means of travel between Superstition Mountain and the surrounding towns was by horseback or afoot. Since those long forgotten days, little has changed within the boundaries of the Superstition Wilderness Area. Today, one must still travel …

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The tale of the Soldiers’ Lost Mine continues to circulate around campfires in the Superstition Wilderness Area of central Arizona. The story is often associated with the Lost Dutchman Mine and the Silver King Mine. Sims Ely mentioned the story in depth in his book The Lost Dutchman Mine, pu…

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Anyone well versed in the history and prospector lore of the Superstition Wilderness Area has heard of Alva Reser. He prefered to be called Al by his friends. Al Reser devoted almost fifty years to his search for the Lost Dutchman Mine. What would possess a man of Al’s background to pursue s…

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Editor’s note: The Apache Junction/Gold Canyon News was saddened to learn of Ron Eagle’s passing last week. He was known to many as a friendly volunteer at the Community Veterans’ Center in Apache Junction, where he spent his last years making a difference in fellow vets’ lives. In this arti…

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Recently, my wife, Sharon, and I went on a four-wheel drive adventure. All of our jeep trips are adventures. This was Sharon’s first trip in about eleven months, because of various treatments she has been undergoing.

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History is often best served by the preservation of landmarks. The Superstition Wilderness is filled with landmarks significant of historical mention. It is very difficult to research the history of a given area if all the historical landmarks have been changed or erased. What if we became t…

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Prospectors and treasure hunters have often referred to Peter’s Mesa as the heartland of the lost gold and treasure stories about Superstition Mountain. History has recorded many expeditions in this region based on stories and different maps of the region. These trips may have begun long bef…

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It was on February 13, 1927, a special train with five cars arrived in Phoenix from Los Angeles. The purpose of the special train was to carry a company of fifty famous Player-Lasky players who were filming a western movie for Paramount Films.

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Some of my Que Pasa columns are apparently “foreign” to certain people. And if you say they are “Greek” to you, you are quoting Shakespeare. Four hundred years ago this month, at age 52, on April 23, 1616, William Shakespeare died.

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The Superstition Wilderness Area and Superstition Mountain in particular have been an attraction to human kind for more than a millennium. First came the Native Americans who found the region conducive to their way of living. Hunting and gathering was their main means of survival. The region…

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Some thirty-two years ago, Bob Corbin and I visited Ernie Provence and Tracy Hawkins at the store called the Lost Dutchman Mine Store, some eight miles east of Highway 60 on the old Quarter U Circle Ranch road. The store was located about a mile east from the junction of Peralta Road and Qua…

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Many years ago, I received a call from a man in northern California who was interested in Yeti or “Big Foot.” He had heard of the Reavis Valley, a landlocked biotic island high above the Sonoran Desert floor that supported a dense Ponderosa pine forest. He wanted to know how to get to the Re…

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Over the years former Arizona Attorney General Bob Corbin and I made many trips into the Superstition Wilderness Area checking on various sites associated with the story of the Dutchman’s Lost Mine. We traveled to some of the most remote areas of the wilderness.

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The following incident is somewhat strange by modern standards. The Arizona Citizen, on December 7, 1877, reported a case of accidental poisoning at Bear Tanks north of Picket Post Mountain. The story goes something like this.

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The American Civil War began 155 years ago last week. Forces of the Confederacy fired their cannons on Union troops at Fort Sumter, South Carolina, on April 12, 1861, beginning a four-year carnage that left more than 600,000 Americans dead and thousands more wounded and scarred.

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The beauty of the Sonoran Desert in the spring time is fabulous. This past winter has been a very wet season, averaging more than 1.60 inches per month. This precipitation will substantially produce plenty of tinder and much of the older dead growth will provide fuel for the slightest spark,…

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Sometimes we think that leaders are people with certain job titles—e.g., manager, director, chair or superintendent. Of course, people with these and other titles should be leaders, but for our workplaces and communities to function effectively, everyone needs to practice leadership every day.

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When there is rain in our area, the desert changes dramatically, and this week’s column is about some spectacular scenery along the old Apache Trail during the recent rains.

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By Tom Kollenborn I was sitting around the other day, picking my guitar, when I got to thinking about the many wonderful trips I’ve made back into the Superstition Wilderness during the past sixty years. For a moment I wondered if the time had been wasted. I assured myself it certainly had not been. I…

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The Superstition Mountain region has very rugged terrain and many hiding places. Some of the area’s hidden canyons had sufficient water to support illegal whiskey distilling during Prohibition.

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Phoenix was the center of a mystery that entwined the apparent prosaic present and one of the well-known legends of early mining in Arizona territory near the turn of the 20th century. Arizona abounds in tales and legends, wild and fanciful, told by storytellers over many a campfire and in m…

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You can’t imagine the surprising and unbelievable stories I have heard over the past three scores of years. The tales of gold and treasure lost among the deep canyons and towering spires within the wilderness of Superstition Mountain are numerous. These tales would stir the souls of young me…

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When we speak of Peter’s Mesa these days, the first thoughts often reflect on the death of Walter Gassler in May of 1984. I worked for the Barkley’s and often hauled salt to the Salt Grounds on Peter’s Mesa. The numerous trips in the late 1950s brought me in contact with a large selection of…

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The Apaches are not known for their stories about Superstition Mountain. Few Apaches have actually ever entered the area. It was the Yavapais who had villages in the area we today call the Superstition Wilderness Area. It was also the Yavapais who were pursued by the Army and their camps destroyed.

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When I worked for the Barkley Cattle Company in the late 1950s, there were two armed groups occupying the area along the western side of Weaver’s Needle. These armed camps needed water to survive and maintain their operations in the mountains.

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Gold and treasure have attracted men and women to the Superstition Mountain region for more than a century, and their quest for lost treasure has often turned tragic.

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Old-timers who are familiar with the search for the Lost Dutchman Mine will recognize the names of Richard “Dick” Holmes, Julia Thomas, the Petrasch brothers, Guidon Roberts, James A. Bark and Sims Ely as important figures associated with the never ending drama about lost gold in the Superst…

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Prior to the turn of the 20th century, bighorn sheep and the desert antelope could be found in and around the Superstition Mountain region. The bighorn sheep were recently reintroduced to the wilderness, but the desert antelope are now extinct. It is not difficult to visualize giant rams bou…

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There are many stories that have circulated around camps and among treasure hunters. These stories often involve cached or hidden gold; sometimes a lost mine story was included. Thirty or forty years ago, I met a man named Poole. He asked me if I had ever heard of the mountain in the Superst…

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The beauty of the Sonoran Desert in the spring of the year is magnificent, but the abundant growth of desert plants creates a great fire danger as they dry out due to the late spring and early summer heat. Longer and hotter days add to this volatile mixture.

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A man appeared at the Bark-Criswell Ranch in December of 1891, with a burro and a puppy. The burro he called “Chase” and the puppy he called “Yelp.” He informed Jim Bark that the Silver King Mine had shut down again. He asked about securing employment on the ranch. The owner asked him if he …

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The following story is certainly filled with much speculation, but still has some interesting and valid historical points. One of Arizona’s most infamous characters was a madam by the name of “Big Nose” Kate. She was born Mary Katherine Harnoy, in Budapest, Hungary, on November 7, 1850. Her …

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Goldfield and the famous Mammoth Mine have long ceased to be the booming mining camp they were at the turn of the Twentieth Century. The inhabitants have left and little remains today of its glorious past. Remnants of this era can be found on the base of a large alluvial fan. This alluvia fa…